Sunday, 27 April 2008

Starbucks and Stories

Coffee and conversation with the indomitable Yvonne Foong - and it's the second time I made her wait. This time, it's because I got lost. I hate Subang Jaya. Like everywhere else in the state, the signboards made no sense.

She has a debilitating disease, but it doesn't stop her at all. Earlier she'd written a masterful response to a journalist's poor professional conduct. There was talk about creating a branded charity foundation-or-whatnot. Discussions about psychology, marketing and, of course, blogs.

You do not want her angry at you.

Next time, I'm studying a map - and then, test-driving the route.



There was supposed to be something about this month's LitBloggers' Breakfast with Kunal Basu, but I couldn't be bothered. Besides, I wouldn't want people to think I attend all these meets just so I could post something... .

Some interesting and pertinent points garnered from the meet include:

  • 's chemical. Stories are all chemical. Natural ones produced by your body, of course.
  • Let the story take centerstage. Don't fit stories into themes.
  • Don't give a shit about readers. Write what you want, write what you like. And pray the readers you don't give a shit about will like it too.
  • Research is important (and from his tone of voice it could also be fun). If all else fails, fill the gaps with your imagination. Why else would you call it "fiction", duh?
  • Most lit-fic readers are women; no woman, all (lit-fic authors) cry. In this case, Bob Marley had it wrong.
  • MPH Bangsar can't get their hands on chicken mayo.

2 comments:

  1. I envy the people who is easily satisfied. They have higher levels of excitatory hormones and any more will overwhelm them. Mine seems to fluctuate. Hey, if I wrote about our meet with photo, and you blog about it, our readers can draw conclusions about your identity. Hahaha no more anonymity then.

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  2. Yvonne: *gasp* Don't you dare.

    Actually I think more "normal" people are complacent, not contented, because we take too much for granted. Food for thought.

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